15 creative exercises that are better than brainstorming

We all know traditional brainstorming to produce new ideas. You sit in a room with a white board and work with everything that goes through your head. Maybe you play a few word-matching tricks to reinforce your ideas, or use Google to flesh out your research. But there are many exercises to solve problems and develop new ideas, individually or in groups. . Ranked from structured to ridiculous, here are 15 creative brainstorming exercises and techniques that will help you get the best result to solve your problems. Brainstorming Techniques Storyboarding Mind Mapping Group Sketch Word Banking SCAMPER SWOT Analysis Six Hats of Reflection Draft of Brain Compensation Questioning Hypothesis Wishing Alter-Egos / Hero Forced Connections Inverted Brainstorming Brain-Writing Visual Activities 1. Storyboarding If you are trying to design a process, the storyboard can help you see where your collective understanding of a problem supports or conflicts with a proposed solution, and where more thought / research is needed. By developing a visual story to explore the problem in narrative form, your team will be able to see how ideas interact and connect to form a solution. Sticky notes are your friend. Take a few minutes for all team members to write their ideas as individual notes. These do not have to be complete - physically pinning quotes, images, user information, and so on. can help you see new relationships between different components. Once you have a group of sticky notes put them on the board as a progression: first this, then that. By organizing your ideas into a continuous series, you will be able to see new links and eliminate superfluous elements that would not help you. 2. Concept Mapping Concept mapping is a fairly common term nowadays. In fact, many types of software provide automated conceptual mapping models that help you better organize your data. Well, this also turns out to be a great way to organize your ideas. To create a mind map for creative purposes, write the task or problem that you are trying to solve in the center of your Idea Sheet (do not hesitate to do it on your own). computer, but whiteboards are ideal.) Next, expand on this problem by enclosing terms that better describe what you need . If your problem is the low traffic on the site, for example, some terms to write around this sentence could be "organic traffic", "approved…

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The simple guide on Twitter Analytics

When launched in 2014, Twitter Analytics marked an advance (or even a delay) towards greater transparency and measurement capabilities for all its users. continued to upgrade this tool, after creating a stand-alone analysis application called Engage in 2016 and launched the analysis for Twitter moments. Although users now have a better overview of their Twitter account statistics, you may not be using this data. Perhaps you have searched the home page of Twitter Analytics and thought you can track impressions and metrics by promoted or natural activity ... and that's about it all . The good news is that you can discover a lot more information in your activity dashboard Tweet: you simply need to know where to look. Beyond basic settings, here are some extremely important information that you can discover on your Twitter account and your audience with the help of Tweet Analytics. Then, take a look at some of the free third-party analytics tools that allow you to better understand the Twitter performance metrics on which you want more information. How to use Twitter Analytics You can access Twitter Analytics by pressing your profile and select "Analytics" from the drop-down menu:

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ultimate-guide-internet-things-iot

  ultimate-guide-internet-things-iot .If you're like me, you're probably analyzing your brain by trying to remember the information from an article you read about smart homes two or three years ago ... and your arm is probably getting tired. I understood.The Internet of Things (IoT) was so difficult to understand that I found myself thinking that the Internet of Things (IoT) is "here," but what about exactly? And how does it affect my life? Let's take a look at what IoT is, how it will change the future and how you can use it for your business. Do not hesitate to go directly to a specific section or send it to you by email for later: Your Apple Watch? This is part of the IoT. Google Home? Yeah, it's an IoT device too. Heck, the entire city of Barcelona is composed of IoT devices. In recent years, IoT has quietly conquered the world and is not slowing down anytime soon. In fact, by 2020, 31 billion devices will be connected to the Internet of Things. To put things in perspective, there are more than three IoT devices for every person on earth. IoT Devices So we have a general idea of ​​what IoT devices are - you are currently using them one to read this article. But phones and computers are only a small part of the IoT. IoT devices include everything that can connect to the Internet to send and receive data. And it turns out that almost everything can be connected this way. There are IoT coffee machines that emit alerts when you run out of coffee. The beds connected to the IoT monitor your sleep and adjust the temperature to optimize your sleep patterns. The most practical applications of IoT include connected cars that can drive and update themselves, as well as Amazon's dashboard buttons allowing customers to order daily products such as Replenishment Dash goes one step further by allowing products to rearrange automatically when a sensor records that consumables are low. When expanding a market is as simple as clicking a button, it's not hard to see how companies will start to embrace this new level of connectivity. Department stores like Macy's use iBeacons in store to send customers rewards and targeted experiences such as celebrity dating and the Black Friday. Tags are small Bluetooth transmitters that connect to the corresponding applications installed on connected devices…

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The key to productivity is not your mind, it's your body

Welcome to The Science Behind Success - a new series of blogs that explores the best ways to help our brains perform better at work. Through psychological research and interviews with leaders in the field, we show you how psychology can help you overcome barriers in the workplace and excel in your career. Because a small change in mentality can go very far. If you are like me, you do not think the day is over until your to-do list is complete. You wake up in the morning with a long list of everything you need to do and move on the autopilot throughout the day, checking the tasks as you go. When you think you have taken a break (after a few hours of work), you eat quickly and second cup of coffee. Then we go back to work. You finish most days around 5 pm or 6 pm, wishing you have more hours to tackle your projects. You go to the gym for an hour, then come home for a quick dinner and maybe a little TV. Often the only real break you give yourself is when your head hits the pillow. Here's the problem: in our quest for optimal productivity, we often ignore the needs of our body. But, without our knowledge, it makes us much less productive. Josh Davis, Ph.D., Director of Research and Senior Professor at the NeuroLeadership Institute, discusses this paradox in his international best-seller, Two Great Hours: Science-based Strategies to Master Your Best Time and do your most important work . In his book, Davis writes, "Staying at work without interruption and working longer hours a computer or machine. But ... we are biological creatures. We continually ask for a type of work - and a constant level of efficiency - from our brains, that is as if we are continually asking for the same speed from a runner under any circumstances. Davis argues that we do not take sufficient account of our biological factors to make decisions about our efficiency and productivity at work. It's not wrong - what was the last time you stopped and said :, I bet I would be better in this meeting if my blood sugar level went up in a snack? Or, when did you last consider jogging on your desk, just to relieve your stress? Probably never. Davis's research is based on the theory of…

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