I would have liked never to build a personal brand

Some of you who read this know who I am. And many of you do not do it. So, for those of you who ... I'm calling Neil Patel and I am the co-founder of an advertising agency called Neil Patel Digital. I've also co-founded some marketing technology companies. I blog about marketing at NeilPatel.com and, in the last 31 days, I've been able to reach 1,701,486 people on my blog. I have a decent audience after ... 927,000 fans on Facebook, 298,000 followers on Twitter 289,802 followers on LinkedIn and 159,588 subscribers on YouTube . During the past 28 days, 43,196 people So, can you see the problem with everything I do? Everything is related to my name. None of my businesses have so much traffic, and they are not nearly social follow-ups as my personal blog you are reading right now. And this is not even the biggest problem, that I will address later . ] But before explaining why I would no longer build a personal brand, let me turn to the following question: [19659015] Why did I build a personal brand? I never planned to build a personal brand. I started my career in marketing at the age of 16 years. My first website was a notice board called Advice Monkey (no longer exists) that I had started at the age of 16. I had no idea how to generate traffic ... I just thought you had set up a website and that people were visiting. Finally, I saved enough money to pick up trash and clean the toilets in an amusement park to pay a marketing company. They tore me up and gave little or no results. I did not have any other choice than to learn online marketing. I did so well that Advice Monkey started to rank on Google for competitive offers such as job offers, job search and technology. Essentially, I ranked for so many positions and careers that Advice Monkey started generating more than 100,000 visitors a month. I know that this does not seem to be an important traffic, but for a listless job board, the Internet not being as popular 17 years ago, and for me a 16 year old, I did not do too much harm . But that's it, I've never been able to do monkey work advice. I just did not know how to monetize it.…

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What is guerrilla marketing? 7 examples to inspire your brand

The word "guerrilla", in its written form, seems very intense. It evokes images of rebellion and conflict. Put it next to the word "marketing," and many people ask, "huh?" But guerrilla marketing is not a form of combative communication. After all, it would be very disruptive, which is contrary to the method of reception. In fact, it is actually an unconventional form of inbound marketing because it increases awareness of large audiences without interrupting them. Because it is not conventional, it is not the easiest concept to explain. Guerrilla marketing is often better understood when it is observed, which explains how we will approach its best practices and proposals. We will begin with What is guerrilla marketing? Roots of War When we hear the term "guerrilla marketing," here are some basic notions about its origin and how it works. "It is hard not to think of guerrilla warfare - which is logical since it is there that this style of marketing took its name.In the context of the war, guerrilla tactics largely depend on the element of surprise Think: "Ambushes, sabotage, raids", according to Creative Guerrilla Marketing. But how does this translate into our daily work? In marketing, guerrilla techniques play mostly on the element of surprise It aims to create highly unconventional campaigns that unexpectedly attract people during their daily activities.You will see what this looks like in some examples below. The term itself was created at the beginning of the 1980s by the young writer Jay Conrad Levinson, who wrote several books on guerrilla tactics in several professional fields.Of course, at that time, marketing in general was very di and even though guerrilla marketing is still in use today, the ever-changing digital landscape is changing what it looks like. Again - you'll see what it looks like in some of the examples below. Friendly Budget What marketers really appreciate in guerrilla marketing is their relatively inexpensive nature. The real investment here is creative, intellectual - but implementing it does not have to be expensive. Michael Brenner summarizes it well in his article on "guerrilla content," where he frames this style of marketing in the same context as the reallocation of your existing content, such as entering certain segments of a report. It is an investment of time, but not money in itself. In a way, guerrilla marketing works by redefining the current environment of your audience. Evaluate it…

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SEO Reputation Management: How to Own Your Brand Keywords in Google – Whiteboard Friday

Posted by randfish The first experience of a researcher with your brand occurs on Google's SERPs - and not on your website. Having the ability to influence their first organic impression can go a long way towards improving both the customer perception of your brand and the conversion rates. In today's whiteboard on Friday, Rand takes us through the challenges inherent in managing SEO reputation and tactics to do it effectively. Click on the whiteboard image above to open a high resolution version in a new tab! Video transcription Howdy, Moz fans and welcome to another edition of Whiteboard Friday. This week, we discuss the management of SEO reputation. It turns out that I have had several conversations with many of you in the Moz community and many friends from the world of startups and entrepreneurship about this problem that arises from consistent way. Seeking your brand in Google, experience their first experience before you even arrive on your site. Their first experience with your brand is via Google's search results page. This SERP, controlling what appears here, what it says, how it says it, where it ranks, where it ranks, all these kinds of things, can have a strong influence on a lot of things. The Challenge We know that the content of search results can have an impact ... Your conversion rate. People see that criticism is generally mediocre or that the wording is confusing or that it creates questions in their mind that your content is not responding. This can affect your conversion rate. This can hinder amplification. People who see you here, who think you have something negative or negative, are less likely to bond or share or talk about you. This can have an impact on customer satisfaction. Customers who are going to buy from you, but who see something negative in the search results, are more likely to complain about it. Or if they find that your rating or rating is lower or otherwise, they are more likely to contribute negatively than they had seen you had stellar problems. Their expectations are biased by what is in these research results. So many conversations I've had, for example with people in the startup business, look like, "Hey, people are looking at my product, we're barely there at the moment." We do not have those customers as customers, we may think that we are doing astroturfing…

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The Ultimate Guide to Brand Awareness

Have you ever heard people describe themselves as "Apple people", "Nike people" or "Trader Joe's people"? habits so that consumers do not have to think twice before becoming a customer, time and time again. This guide will help you better understand brand awareness, establish it with your audience and develop morph campaigns with your company. Let's dive in. Brand awareness may seem like a vague concept and, in truth, it is. For traders and business owners who like to evaluate success with sharp and orderly numbers, brand awareness will likely shake your feathers. But this is not because it is not a metric that can be perfectly determined does not carry value. Brand awareness is extremely important to the success of the company and the overall marketing goals. Here's why. Brand Awareness Fosters Trust In a world where consumers rely on extensive research and the opinion of others before making a simple purchase, brand confidence is paramount. Once a consumer adheres to your brand, he is more likely to make repeated purchases with little or no thought - thus bridging the gap between trust and loyalty. When you put a proverbial face to your brand name, consumers can trust more easily. Brand awareness efforts give your brand a personality and a point of sale to be sincere, receive feedback and tell a story. These are all ways in which we humans build trust with each other. The man / brand relationship is not different. Brand Awareness Creates Association When you had a paper cut, I bet you put a bandage on. When you have had an urgent question, I am sure you have googled it. When you need to make some copies, I guess you have them Xeroxed. And when you're packed for a good picnic, I'm willing to bet you got a Coke to drink. Am I right? Probably. But ... notice how some of the words above are in uppercase. These are marks, not nouns or verbs. Speaking of Unbranded Band-Aid should be called Bandage, Google, Search Engine, and Xerox, Copier. But it's more fun to refer to the brand itself, even if we do not use their product . That's what makes brand awareness. It associates actions and products with particular brands, unconsciously encouraging us to replace common words with brand terms. And before you know it, simple paper cuts or picnics promote our brand. Brand Awareness…

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