Want to prove the success of the content? Stop measuring it

What are you trying to measure? What does success look like? Too often, the answers to these questions are irrelevant to each other. One of my favorite books on data and measurement It's almost 30 years old, but it's more relevant than ever. He proposes a method to architect a system in order to appreciate the difference between the data and the information (index: one has a context and thus an influence on the action) and one reaches a real commercial measurement. Quotes from the book should resonate with content marketers: Tell me how you will measure me and I will tell you how I am going to behave. If you measure me illogically, do not complain about the illogical behavior. When I work with a company to develop its measurement strategy for content marketing, two main challenges emerge. First, the company generally has no real goal or purpose for its content marketing initiative. Many companies simply define their content marketing by producing ad hoc assets and measuring them as any campaign-based asset. The team is usually blocked (or resolved) to use content metrics such as clicks, shares, visits, and so on. In other words, it is interesting to know that the article or computer graphics has been found and read. it changes? You do not know. It's cool to know that a blog post has been read, but what behavior has changed, asks @Robert_Rose. Click for Tweet The second challenge, related to the first, is that While companies have a media initiative that allows them to collect and develop audiences, they simply do not know how to connect this new audience to a optimized purchasing behavior. In other words, "It's interesting that we have 5,000 people in our content marketing mailing list, but when are we going to sell them or convert them to leads? Will not it alienate them? "You do not know Wait a minute, should not you know if the content has changed the behavior of the public? Do not you know how content can convert subscriber lists into sales? Maybe, maybe not In the blog, CMI's books, workshops, and master classes, we're talking about measuring content marketing by looking at "the audiences that others are doing" marketing through other means. But, OK, what does it mean in the context of what you should measure? Quite funny, the second half of the wonderful Quote from Eli…

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31 content marketing articles worthy of interest that should die

If you could pick one thing in content marketing that you want to delete today, what would it be? What about the only thing you expect in 12 months? This is what we asked the presenters of Content Marketing World. Not surprisingly, they had a lot to say. Their answers are diverse and sometimes contradictory. Chatbots, webinars, live streams, GIFs, influencers, ROI and many other topics are on the list. But should they die or expect to be strong? Continue reading to discover. (Note: Although we used "expect to be strong" as a label, some comments reflect already strong things that should remain so in a year.) ] Jason Schemmel Social Media Director, Harper Collins Christian Publishing A Dream: The term "Best Practices." the means are, "that's what worked for us." Too many people take this information and think, "If I do it exactly as they did, I will see the same success." ] Expect to be strong: Short videos (30 seconds or less) with captions. Put the term "best practices". It is a shortened state of mind. @JasonSchemmel #CMWorld Click to Tweet Ahava Leibtag President, Aha Media Group Wish wished to die: Long-form video content that is not fragmented. One Expects to Be Strong: Instagram Stories will be a success for a long time. Marketers must now be smarter about how to exploit them. Marketers must now be smarter to take advantage of @Instagram Stories. @ahaval #CMWorld Click to Tweet Ben H. Rome Director, Marketing, American Industrial Hygiene Association The wish would be to die: Stop Calling JIF, people. It's a GIF - with a hard G! Expect to be strong: The epic marketing marketing war will continue. Stop calling JIF. Ian Cleary CEO, RazorSocial The wish would be to die: Livestreaming of content that is not interesting. People are living because it's a trend, not because they have a good business strategy. Livestreaming is a trend, but the essential of the content is not interesting. @ iancleary. #CMWorld Click to Tweet Karl Sakas Agency Advisor, Sakas & Company The wish would be to die: Promotion of ladle webinars. I would love to see the end of the surprising content of educational webinars, then offer barely veiled selling points. Bait and switch is never a good strategy. One Expects to Be Strong : Podcasting, Audio Content, and Audio Marketing Let's leave webinar promotions shady. Stop surprising the education for…

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How to take your travel content on a better trip

Editor's note: In case you missed this message last year, we will report it to you and add new content . I've heard about it are people who believe that "it's half less fun". But for me, everything that happens between my decision to leave my house and my lying on a beach chair with a fruity drink is static and delayed. To reduce the friction I may encounter when embarking on a trip, I rely on the advice and assistance that travel experts provide online. And, judging by the number of content creators that operate in this space, I'm not the only one. With so many points of contact to interact with, improve the customer journey and the many challenges your business can overcome, content marketing in the travel and travel industry. Hospitality offers tremendous opportunities to build trust, create memorable moments, and add value to intrepid explorers and tired business travelers The content of travel and tourism does not matter. is not an endless summer Of course, as a tourism marketing specialist, you know that your job is not just about posting inspiring photos and telling fun stories. the sun. You have to face significant challenges in successful storytelling in this space, not to mention competition. The #contentmarketing travel industry requires more than just snapshots and fun stories in the sun. @joderama Click to Tweet Time and place matter - a lot According to Andrew Davis, bestselling author of Town Inc. and host of Travel, Tourism, and Hospitality Lab at Content Marketing World 2018, travel is one of the only areas where the place you occupy in business is just as important as your business. Contrary to the experience of industries where the digital world has crushed the world and opened up new opportunities, the growth of travel and tourism depends on your company's ability to get people out of their homes ( and their computers) and move them to their place of work. In terms of content, Andrew advises to focus less on what you propose as a business on compelling people to want to visit your site. "You must first increase the demand for the destination you serve," he says. Andrew also points out that timing and seasonality play a much larger role in tourism and tourism marketing than in other industries. For example, while consumer goods and other retail outlets are experiencing a period of…

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11 Content Preservation and Collaboration Tools to Save Time

Editor's note: You may have missed the original version of this article a few years ago. We share today the updated version of Aaron, as more efficient team work is a constant need for content marketers . As content marketers, we have some work to do. pretty hard. Unfortunately, when we add all the curating, collecting and collaborating services needed for large-scale engagement, surpassing is a euphemism. Yet, organization and collaboration are essential. And not just for internal research. In a landslide, social media is at the top of the list of content types that B2C (96%) and B2B (94%) marketers report using. The problem is that marketing on social networks Without curation, we inevitably pack our feeds with a promotion after launch. And, without collaboration, we end up being echo chambers of our trends - rather than a diverse repertoire of opinion leaders. says @AaronOrendorff. Click to Tweet When Content Marketing Institute and MarketingProfs asked B2B marketers what prevented them from developing a large-scale content marketing strategy, the two biggest hurdles were a "small team" (67). %). ) and "lack of time" (44%): The question is: how to create a system to collaborate on content that do not require more people or waste your time? The answer lies in these 11 tools. HAND-ASSOCIATED CONTENT: How to Manage Content Like a Pro: 8 Lessons [Examples] Your Most Powerful Assets with this 3-Stage Hardening Process [19659017] 1. Quuu Before You Go 39, enter Quuu, let me avoid an objection: "How Evernote is not it No. 1?" Two reasons. First, because most of us already use Evernote for content marketing, including one that would not be revolutionary. Second, mastering Evernote can be intimidating and it's not a platform with which I can speak with expertise. What I can say is the desire to automate social sharing without losing human contact. Using @quuu_co to automate social sharing without losing human contact, says @AaronOrendorff. Click to Tweet Enter Quuu. Quuu is the first human-designed social sharing automation tool designed for humans. Here's how it works: The Quuu community submits unique social posts via Quuu Promote to categories that are reviewed by the Quuu editorial board to ensure quality. These messages are then automatically shared between your connected social accounts - Twitter, LinkedIn and Facebook - or you can ask Quuu to send you daily suggestions to find you quickly. Automatic sharing and suggestions are…

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