The Ultimate Guide to the Google Search Console in 2018

Google Search Console Overview GSC (formerly Google Webmaster Tools) is a free platform for anyone with a website to monitor how Google views and optimizes their site. its organic presence. This includes displaying your reference domains, mobile site performance, detailed search results, and queries and high traffic pages. At any time, SGC is open in two to ten tabs. It's useful at macro and micro levels - both when I have to understand what has become of a very popular blog post that has suddenly plummeted and see how many HubSpot impressions wins month after month. I am a content strategist within HubSpot's SEO team, which means that GSC is especially useful to me. But whoever owns a website can and should dive into these waters. According to Google, whether you're a business owner, SEO specialist, marketer, site administrator, web developer or application creator, Search Console will help you. I remember the first time I opened GSC - it was overwhelming. There were tons of labels I did not understand (index cover?!?), Hidden filters and confusing graphics. Of course, the more I used it, the less confused he became. But if you want to avoid the learning curve (and why not you), good news: I will reveal everything I've learned. about using the Google Search Console as a professional. This guide covers: Adding Your Website to Google Search Console Configuring Owners, Users, and Permissions Submitting a Site Map Description of the Site Use of dimensions and metrics Addition of filters Use of GSC (23 cases of use) First of all. If you have not registered with GSC yet, now is the time to do it. How to add your website to the Google Search Console? Sign in to your Google Account. Make sure you use your professional account (and not personal) if it's a professional website. Go to Google Webmaster Tools. Click on "Add Property". Choose "Website" from the drop-down menu. menu and enter the URL of your site. Make sure you use the exact URL that appears in the browser bar. Click "Continue". Choose a way to verify that your website is yours (HTML file download, domain name provider, HTML tag, GA tracking). code, or GTM container extract). If your site supports http: // and https: //, add both as separate sites. You must also add each domain (for example, hubspot.com, blog.hubspot.com, and www.hubspot.com). Google starts tracking your property…

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Expert Guide for Optimizing Automated Rules in Google Ads

Managing a Google Ads account can be difficult, especially if you do not have the time or the dedicated team. Fortunately, there are ways to automate your accounts directly in the platform. One of my favorites is Google's automated rules feature. Today, I will review the rules to follow and give advice on how to make yours as effective as possible. started! Automated Rules Basics Automated rules can be a very powerful way to semi-automate your Google Ads accounts. They are pretty much exactly what they look like: a set of rules with conditions that run automatically and make changes to your accounts. Automated rules are highly customizable and allow you to make scheduled changes to most aspects of an account. Here are all the places that automated rules may apply: When you are ready to create a new rule, you can follow several steps. The first is to simply navigate to the campaign or account you want to automate in the interface. Check the blue box next to what you want to automate, click "Edit," then choose "Create an Automated Rule." ", then choose" Rules "under the" Bulk Actions "section. Once you have selected what you want to automate, you are prompted to select the type of rule to execute. Depending on the aspect of the account you want to automate, there are a handful of different options, but they usually boil down to the following: Break Enable Send an Email [19659013] Change Offer / Budget Each of them is relatively explicit and I will not go into detail at this point. The next part of rule building is where you can be very personalized for your needs. Once you have chosen the type of rule you want to execute, it's time to set conditions. It's where the fun really goes. In the Automated Rules Generator, a screen that looks like this one depends on the chosen route: I will review a slightly more complex rule Change keyword bids based on performance to give you an example to follow. Your rules can be as simple or as complex as you like, but I hope that a slightly more detailed example will be more useful than a simple one. On this screen you will see that there are actually 6 different sections of the construction of a rule: Type of Rule Apply to Define Action Conditions Periods Since we have…

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7 steps to get the most out of the new Google Search Console

Ahrefs, Moz, SEMrush ... there are excellent SEO tools; and with them you can do a variety of things. You can check the backlink profiles. Search by keywords. Find unrelated mentions and publishing opportunities for guests. You can even run full SEO audits with one click. But whether you're an agency or a business, a small business or a business, there are some areas of functionality where these tools are insufficient. And where they fail, the Google Search Console takes precedence. Although powerful, the Gardening SEO Tool is, or should be, complementary to your SEO strategy. If you plan to optimize your organic searches, you should be living in Search Console and use other tools to help you perform auxiliary tasks. Not totally comfortable with Search Console as a living space? Do not worry. Today, I will teach you how to get started with the most essential features of Search Console. Even better: after launching the new and improved Search Console in January, Google officially released it from beta last week. So, while I'm going to teach you 7 steps to get the most out of the new Google Search Console, I'll also explain how the new interface and old interaction differ. All right, then! Let's jump in. Step # 1. Add and Check Your Site Before entering the features, you will want to add and verify your site in Search Console. Go to the drop-down menu at the top left of your dashboard and click on "Add Property". Make sure you enter the URL of your site exactly as it appears in your browser. If you support multiple protocols (http: // and https: //) or multiple domains (example.com, m.example.com, and www.example.com), be sure to add each of them as that distinct property. Once your site is added, Search Console starts collecting data. The mere addition of a property will not give you access - you must also verify that you own it. Navigate to the Manage Properties tab for the property you added on the Search Console Home page. Select "Check Property" from the drop-down list and choose one of the recommended audit methods. These vary depending on the composition of the site you are checking. If you're struggling to implement one of the verification methods, if you want to change your verification method, or simply get a more detailed explanation of each process, this page is a great…

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Viewing Time: Project Management Procedure Using Google Sheets

Posted by R0bin_L0rd The short version of this post: Project management is an essential part of our marketing work, but planning and visualization of projects over time is difficult. this job easier for you. I found this system useful in several ways. So I share my models here in case it would reduce your day. I will begin with a brief overview of what the sheets do, but in the last part of this article, I will also expand on them so that you can modify them according to your needs. If you want to skip this publication and go directly to the templates, you can access it here (but I recommend you read a bit on how they work first): Planner Version (All You Need to Know, plus Gantts) Stakeholder Version (a cleaner version for bosses, customers, or people doing the work but not managing a project) Missed version (combined view of many different projects, telling you if you forgot to talk about work to someone, deadline or planning) It should be mentioned that I do not consider these leaves as the only solution. It's a free solution that I found very useful, but I have colleagues who swear by Smartsheet and Teamwork. It should also be noted that different tools work better or worse with different styles. My goal with these cards is to have a pretty concrete plan for the next three or four months, then a broader set of ideas to go further. When I complete these sheets, I also focus on results rather than processes - this helps to reduce the time spent updating sheets and makes everything that people can read more clearly. The long version of this article looks a lot like the short version above, but I'm talking in more detail about some of the principles I'm trying to follow and how this configuration fills them (shocker, huh?). As promised, the last section will describe how the leaves work, for anyone who has problems or wants to do something. Table of Contents (if you simply want to move to a specific section): The 3 Principles (Concerning Both People and Leaves) An Early Conclusion Appendices & Instructions How to Add Tasks to the List Splitting Tasks over Multiple Periods Using the Monthly View Tab (Scheduler and Stakeholder Versions) How to Operate the Gantt Charts ( and add categories) How to Operate Gantt Charts…

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